November is NaNoWriMo!

As of yesterday, NaNoWriMo has begun. In 2009, more than 165,000 participants took on the challenge, and even higher numbers are expected this year. In honor of those who undertake this vast but fulfilling project, this month I will be posting reviews of writing-related books.

“The Graveyard Book” by Neil Gaiman

The Graveyard Book was truly a delight to read, and I appreciated Gaiman’s intelligent handling of complex issues without losing sight of his inventive narrative. I would recommend this book to almost anyone for its fully formed characters, excellent prose, and engaging plot.

“Macbeth” by William Shakespeare

While it was fun to read and act out a play together, perhaps Jack and I chose the wrong work; neither of us particularly liked this one. The entire play seemed very disjointed, like there was a scene or even an act missing.

“Wuthering Heights” by Emily Brontë

Such a powerful story of love and loss ages well, and the unconventional use of an unreliable narrator had an interesting effect upon my view of the characters and story. The supernatural elements throughout the novel only serve to add to the dark, intense feelings between the two lovers.

Halloween Reading

I’ve signed up for the Halloween Readathon hosted by Young Adult Books Reviewed this weekend… that’s right, I’m ready for some more readathon action! It’ll be a spook-tacular weekend!

“Fingerprints” by Joel Church

Fingerprints, Joel Church’s first collection of flash fiction, captures both the enticing and the mundane. Set against the backdrop of Washington, D.C., Church’s characters explore topics ranging from sexuality and drug abuse to childhood and loss. These stories extend from two to ten pages long, and their brevity makes them an excellent read on the metro; I could read for only one or two stops and not feel completely lost the next time I opened the book.

My Mailbox: R. Scott Bakker and Chris Baty

In My Mailbox was begun by Kristi over at The Story Siren. The idea is that I tell you what I’ve received this week, whether for free, from the library, or through a good old fashioned purchase. I’m also including the publisher’s blurb and my reason for wanting to read the book.

Still Reading

Readathon is nearing its end, but I’ve decided to make up for time lost sleeping. That’s right, folks–I’m ready for another day of nonstop reading. I haven’t yet hit my goal, so I’ll keep you updated as I go.

Great Books Week: Desert Island Reading List

If you were stranded alone on a deserted island, what five books would you want? This question goes deeper that listing which books made a great impression on me. If I only had five books to read and re-read for the rest of my life, what would I choose?

“To Have and Have Not” by Ernest Hemingway

To Have and Have Not is my least favorite Hemingway book so far. Though Hemingway attempts to dissect grand social issues, such as troubled economic times and the relationship that exists between husband and wife, the entangled sub-plots and the erratic activities of the characters serve to distract from whatever statement Hemingway is trying to make.

Fall into Reading 2010

After several rainy days last week, this past weekend was gorgeous, and I spent several lovely hours reading in the great outdoors while camping in southern Maryland. However, the reddening leaves and the cool nights reminded me that my favorite season is upon us, and I can’t think of a better way to celebrate fall than by having a reading challenge!

“The Hobbit” by J.R.R. Tolkien

The Hobbit is one of the best books I’ve read all year. Because of its intensely imaginative plot and Tolkien’s masterful literary execution, The Hobbit is one of those few books that are equally attractive to kids and adults alike. But you probably already knew that!