In My Mailbox: Meg Wolitzer, David Maraniss, Truman Capote, and More!

This video is also a few weeks old, but I promise to have a more recent video up next week! Books mentioned in this episode The Ten-Year Nap by Meg Wolitzer Skipjack: The Story of America’s Last Sailing Oystermen by Christopher White Wings: A Novel of World War II Flygirls by Karl Friedrich (my review here) Guilt by Association by Marcia Clark Into the Story: A Writer’s Journey through Life, Politics, Sports and Loss by David Maraniss The Gang That Wouldn’t Write []

“The Heroine’s Bookshelf” by Erin Blakemore

Recently I’ve been looking back on some of my favorite books from childhood–especially old and new stories about smart, strong women. It’s good to know that I’m not alone in my reminiscing; Erin Blakemore, for one, often returns to her well-worn copies of girlhood classics.

Top Ten Childhood Favorites

It may not surprise you to learn that I was a voracious reader as a child. Some of my fondest memories are of curling up in an armchair and polishing off the latest Babysitter’s Club book; exploring the protected forest surrounding our farmhouse with Laura Ingalls Wilder; and acting out the misadventures of Anne Shirley and Trixie Belden with my friends and siblings.

November 2011 in Review

November 2011 Stats Books in progress: 13 Books read: 7 Pages read: 2,421 November was a busy month, and I fell a little behind in my reviewing. The same thing happened last November too; maybe I should plan on a less ambitious schedule for November 2012? In any case, I’m almost all caught up now. Thanks for bearing with me! Books reviewed This month, I read some great historical fiction. I liked both Vivienne Schiffer’s novel Camp Nine and Caroline Moorehead’s work []

In My Mailbox: Memoirs, Superb Words, and Tinker

In My Mailbox is a way for book bloggers to discuss all of the books that they come across each week. This video is a few weeks old, as you can tell by my clothes and hair! But I wanted to share it now that I’ve resolved my technical difficulties–especially since Tinker makes a guest appearance near the end. Enjoy!

“The Personal History of Rachel DuPree” by Ann Weisgarber

Rachel DuPree is tired. Her five living children are hungry and thirsty, and the baby due any day will add another weight to Rachel’s already overburdened shoulders. The DuPrees have scraped through the long summer drought with dreams of cool drinking water and full bellies, and Rachel is sick with a feeling of failure; she has failed to provide for her family, and she has failed to tame the wild lands that she and her husband, Isaac, claimed fourteen years ago.

Thankfully Reading (and Writing!)

First of all, I would like to apologize for my recent lapse in blogging. Between school, my birthday, and Thanksgiving–not to mention a terrible cold–I haven’t been able to keep up with my usual posts. I’ve got a few entries drafted that I intend to post over the next week, so please be patient with me. It’s good to be back! And I thought I’d come back with a bang. This weekend I participated in one of my favorite readathons, Thankfully Reading. []

Subscription Saturday: Bitch

Called the “feminist response to pop culture,” Bitch magazine is an excellent resource for progressive women and men, whether you identify with the “feminist” moniker or not. (But it helps if you do.) I began reading issue #52, the red issue.

“The Chicktionary” by Anna Lefler

Anna Lefler, stand-up comedian and writer at Life Just Keeps Getting Weirder, has a fresh, intelligent sense of humor that shines in The Chicktionary. Meant as a reference book to the sometimes mystifying and always evolving language of women, Lefler’s satirical book is a barrel of laughs.

Top Ten Cookbooks for Thanksgiving

This is one of my favorite holidays–between eating all the food, hanging out with family, and, of course, making everyone wish me a belated happy birthday, I love Thanksgiving! This week’s top then theme is “authors I would love to have at my Thanksgiving feast,” so I’m highlighting some awesome cookbooks and foodie memoirs.

“The Printmaker’s Daughter” by Katherine Govier

Oei is a painter in her father’s studio, his oldest and most faithful disciple. Her father, Hokusai, is a famed artist throughout Edo, and his influence is reaching other parts of Japan as well. Despite the shogun’s censorship of art and free speech, Hokusai’s work only grows in popularity, and he even sells his art to the Dutch traders who are allowed limited engagement with Japan.