“The Rules of the Tunnel” by Ned Zeman

Title: The Rules of the Tunnel: My Brief Period of Madness
Author: Ned Zeman
ISBN: 9781592405985
Pages: 320
Release date: August 4, 2011
Publisher: Gotham
Genre: Memoir
Format: ARC
Source: TLC Book Tours
Rating: 4 out of 5


Win this book!

I’m giving this book away to one lucky reader in the United States or Canada! Just leave a comment below and you’ll be entered to win. I will be choosing a winner at midnight on September 30.

Possible theme song: “Brain Damage” by Pink Floyd
Kinda like: A modern, humorous take on another memoir released this summer, The Storm at the Door.

What is madness? How does one distinguish between a behavioral disorder and a really bad day?

Ned Zeman, a journalist who has written for Vanity Fair, Newsweek, Spy, GQ, Outside, and Sports Illustrated, turns his eye to the one subject that has constantly eluded him: himself. His zany memoir of madness and memory loss reads like one long feature piece—a profile of himself.

Zeman first grew concerned about his own nature when he found himself identifying a little too much with some of the men on whom he was reporting—from an emperor penguin expert to a fantastically wealthy movie agent to the man obsessed with grizzlies, all of whom displayed passion, depth, and extreme mood disorders.

He begins by inventorying his own life for abnormalities of behavior, and it doesn’t take too long before he encounters deep-seated emotional issues. He ends with a depression so dark that it prompted him to embark on electroconvulsive (ECT) treatments—also known as electroshock.

What happens in the middle is anyone’s guess, for Zeman can’t remember the events of the last year and a half. While ECT has a pretty good track record of helping balance bipolar disorder sufferers, Zeman learns, it also has a pretty wicked side effect: memory loss.

Zeman is as clueless about his life as the reader at the beginning of his story, because he suffers from (or, more accurately, exults in) amnesia. As a reporter who has made his living profiling famous and eccentric characters, Zeman uses his journalistic skills to unravel his recent history—drawing on medical and financial records, emails, notes, and interviews with friends, family, and psychiatrists.

He finds, as he turns his critical reporter’s eye to his own logic-defying behavior, that “the heart remembers what the mind forgets.”

The author’s use of second person narration reinforces the investigative aspect of Zeman’s work; he is telling his own story to himself, and the reader is just along for the ride:

You are a reporter. A gatherer and disseminator of facts. A drive-thru historian. The Amnesiac Reporter. . . . In a way, you felt, this was journalism as it was meant to be.

Zeman’s account is irreverent, inventive, and incredibly unique. He makes being a little crazy very funny. His unusual investigation is ultimately an inquest into who he is, how he became this person, and what he can do to change.

The Rules of the Tunnel is an honest, unsparing look at one writer’s most difficult time. The author doesn’t always seems so great—in fact, at times he comes off as whiny, ungrateful, and sheltered—but his self-deprecating humor is the spoonful of sugar that helps his self-absorption go down. But both are vital parts of this memoir.

The amnesia aspect of the story is fascinating, both as a narrative device and as an educational tool. Though the story can be quite confusing at times, it is usually in a good way. Some parts of the story seem unresolved: what exactly happens to his relationship with his girlfriend? Does he ever experience relapses or doubt his final psychiatrist’s diagnosis?

But to have reduced everything to a neat package would be to negate the book’s point. Life is messy and uncontrolled. You may forget important things and your memories may change, but the person within never does.

Quote of Note:

A Jewish family stops hovering the day they become Presbyterian.

But don’t just take my word for it. Check out what other reviewers on the tour have been saying:

August 1: Rundpinne
August 2: The Broke and the Bookish
August 3: Sara’s Organized Chaos
August 4: Chaotic Compendiums
August 8: Acting Balanced
August 9: Book Dilettante
August 10: BookNAround
August 11: In the Next Room
August 15: A Bookworm’s World
August 17: Take Me Away
August 18: Bookshipper
August 22: Luxury Reading
August 29: Life in Review
August 30: Raging Bibliomania
August 31: My Book Retreat
Date TBD: Brain Candy Book Reviews

Or, of course, leave a comment below to win the book and find out for yourself!

8 responses to ““The Rules of the Tunnel” by Ned Zeman

  1. I would love to win and read this book.
    Thanks for the chance to win it.

  2. Pingback: Winner of “What Language Is” and New Giveaway | Melody & Words

  3. Pingback: Ned Zeman, author of The Rules of the Tunnel: My Brief Period of Madness, on tour August 2011 | TLC Book Tours

  4. I can’t imagine trying to live through his experiences!

    Thanks for being a part of the tour. I’m glad you enjoyed reading this one.

  5. Pingback: Sunday Salon: August in Review | Melody & Words

  6. Pingback: Sunday Salon: September in Review | Melody & Words

  7. I THOUGHT IT WAS A GREAT READ….HOWEVER..I REALLY BELIEVE IT WOULD HAVE BEEN A STUPENDOUS BOOK, IF THE AUTHOR DID NOT USE THE ‘YOU’ WORD EVERY TIME HE WAS WRITING ABOUT HIMSELF..THIS WAS VERY DISCONCERTING TO YOURS TRULY.
    IF HE HAS DONE ANY JUNGIAN THERAPY..HE WOULD KNOW THAT THIS IS A ‘NO-NO.’
    SO BEFORE GOING TO PAPERBACK..MAKE THESE CHANGES AND YOU WILL HAVE A SUPERB BOOK..
    MY HUMBLE OPINION ONLY!
    SINCERELY
    DAVID W. HAY

  8. Pingback: Subscription Saturday: Vanity Fair | Melody & Words

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